[Day 176] Why Stanford has the coterm program

Co-terminal master’s degree is a unique Stanford’s program that allows Stanford undergraduates to stay on for an extra year to earn a master’s degree. You have to apply, but it’s  a pretty easy and sweat-free process. Almost everyone I know who applied  got in. I never knew about the history of the program until today, when I talked to Pat Langley.

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[Day 176] Why Stanford has the coterm program

[Day 171] Lying with statistics: why Allan Lichtman’s predictions aren’t that good

One of my favorite sayings was the one populated by Mark Twain and frequently (probably wrongly) attributed to the late British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” I get slightly annoyed when accredited newspapers use statistics to manipulate readers.

This afternoon, I saw this headline on the Washington Post:

learn365project_statistics_lie

Continue reading “[Day 171] Lying with statistics: why Allan Lichtman’s predictions aren’t that good”

[Day 171] Lying with statistics: why Allan Lichtman’s predictions aren’t that good

[Day 169] The magic of phonetic writing

In my anthropology class, there is this lady who comes to every lecture with a peculiar-looking keyboard and transcribes everything everyone says in the room. The average rate for English speakers in the US is 150 wpm, so I estimate her writing speed is well above 150 wpm because she gets everything everyone says right, even manages to insert things like *bell chiming* or *indiscernible sound in the background*. This is really impressive, given that professional typists only have the speed of 75-85 wpm.

So, after lecture today, I decided to come and introduce myself to her. When I told Sarah, the lady’s name, about my fascination with her typing, she was very excited. She told me she loved talking about that, because she thinks it’s magical too. Here is a picture of the setup that she uses:

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[Day 169] The magic of phonetic writing

[Day 165] Why American cafes have to-go as default

Today, I had a great chat over a cup of coffee with Jon Gauthier, who is, by the way, a delightful human being. When our coffee arrived, Jon remarked:

“It’s a shame that here, in California in general, you have to tell the barista that you want it here, else they’ll default that you want it to go. In Europe, if you don’t tell them anything, they’ll default that you want your coffee in a nice cup.”

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[Day 165] Why American cafes have to-go as default

[Day 164] Life without Facebook

Hey,

I just want to let you know that I’ve been off Facebook for a month, and I haven’t had any desire to get back on it. It’s liberating. Here are some aspects of my life that have become much better without Facebook.

  • I feel more connected to people. It’s ironic since Facebook is supposed to help you connect to your friends, but I feel that connections on Facebook are superficial because they are too convenient. Now, people I interact with are people who really want to interact with me. They would go out of their way to get my number or to send me an email. And I do the same to people I want to connect with.

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[Day 164] Life without Facebook

[Day 163] Being a girl doing muay thai

I’m taking a muay Thai class at  Stanford. It’s not as tough as it sounds. When I did it in Malaysia, the master was like: “50 push-ups, 50 sit-ups, 50 squats, no stop. Hey you, why are you stopping? Do 20 more. Pain is just a state of mind.” Here the instructor is like: “Okay relax your muscles, don’t try too hard, and have a good evening.” It’s a chill environment. I had been enjoying the class until yesterday, when my partner made me realize the uncomfortable reality.

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[Day 163] Being a girl doing muay thai