[Day 407] Dear old people, please stop calling us a failed generation just because we don’t know your favorite band

Picture this. You’re enjoying a beer with a group of friends, some of them are a bit older than you, maybe 5, 10, or 20 years older. A song comes on the speaker. Your older friend goes wild. He sings along. He drums his fingers. He wants you to dance with him to the song but you feel awkward because the song isn’t really your jam.

“You don’t like this song?” Your friend asks in disbelief.
“It’s not that I don’t like it. I just don’t know it.”
“You don’t know this song? What? Do you not know Jim Morrison? The Doors?”

Continue reading “[Day 407] Dear old people, please stop calling us a failed generation just because we don’t know your favorite band”

[Day 407] Dear old people, please stop calling us a failed generation just because we don’t know your favorite band

[Day 406] It’s the end of junior year as I know it

Sup, guys?

It’s summer! The feeling of having no homework is amazing. I can finally do all the things that I’ve been doing throughout the year, but with much less guilt.

I still can’t decide if I had a good year or not. On the one hand, I suffered. A LOT. I overloaded myself with too many things: projects, teaching, writing, rocky relationships, and in the end half-assed everything. In hindsight, I believe I could have learned a lot more if I had tried to learn less.

On the other hand, it was a year of personal growth with amazing experiences. It was the year when I published my third book in Vietnamese. I finished my 2016’s reading challenge: read 50 books. I taught a course at Stanford, which was endorsed by Google, Kaggle, DeepLearning4J and was featured on front page of HackerNews, AI Weekly, and GitHub. A professor invited me to Hungary to help his team with a machine learning project — I accepted and had the time of my life. I started working at one of the world’s most interesting companies. I also fell in love.

Continue reading “[Day 406] It’s the end of junior year as I know it”

[Day 406] It’s the end of junior year as I know it

[Day 290] Did Viraj Mehta really flip off American people on TV?

Being off Facebook, I’ve been entirely oblivious to my friend Viraj’s famed middle-finger. I knew that he has been on Jeopardy and I knew that he’s had some pretty impressive win — the rock I live under isn’t that big — but I wasn’t aware that there was more to that. When I ran into Viraj this afternoon, he was pretty excited:

“Chip, I’m famous now!”
“What? Did you win that $100k?”
“I can’t say, but google my name!”

So I googled “Viraj” and saw this:

Screen Shot 2017-02-23 at 6.26.24 PM.jpg

Continue reading “[Day 290] Did Viraj Mehta really flip off American people on TV?”

[Day 290] Did Viraj Mehta really flip off American people on TV?

[Day 201] “Ew white people”

Today, I went for a boba run with Tucker. He wanted to go to a boba place, but I wanted to go to another because that other place was better. Tucker said: “I wouldn’t know. I can probably tell a terrible boba from an average one, but I wouldn’t be able to tell a good boba from a mediocre one.”

And I said: “Ew white people!”

And Tucker was slightly offended: “What’s wrong with being white?”

Continue reading “[Day 201] “Ew white people””

[Day 201] “Ew white people”

[Day 176] Why Stanford has the coterm program

Co-terminal master’s degree is a unique Stanford’s program that allows Stanford undergraduates to stay on for an extra year to earn a master’s degree. You have to apply, but it’s  a pretty easy and sweat-free process. Almost everyone I know who applied  got in. I never knew about the history of the program until today, when I talked to Pat Langley.

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[Day 176] Why Stanford has the coterm program

[Day 169] The magic of phonetic writing

In my anthropology class, there is this lady who comes to every lecture with a peculiar-looking keyboard and transcribes everything everyone says in the room. The average rate for English speakers in the US is 150 wpm, so I estimate her writing speed is well above 150 wpm because she gets everything everyone says right, even manages to insert things like *bell chiming* or *indiscernible sound in the background*. This is really impressive, given that professional typists only have the speed of 75-85 wpm.

So, after lecture today, I decided to come and introduce myself to her. When I told Sarah, the lady’s name, about my fascination with her typing, she was very excited. She told me she loved talking about that, because she thinks it’s magical too. Here is a picture of the setup that she uses:

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[Day 169] The magic of phonetic writing