[Day 290] Did Viraj Mehta really flip off American people on TV?

Being off Facebook, I’ve been entirely oblivious to my friend Viraj’s famed middle-finger. I knew that he has been on Jeopardy and I knew that he’s had some pretty impressive win — the rock I live under isn’t that big — but I wasn’t aware that there was more to that. When I ran into Viraj this afternoon, he was pretty excited:

“Chip, I’m famous now!”
“What? Did you win that $100k?”
“I can’t say, but google my name!”

So I googled “Viraj” and saw this:

Screen Shot 2017-02-23 at 6.26.24 PM.jpg

Continue reading “[Day 290] Did Viraj Mehta really flip off American people on TV?”

[Day 290] Did Viraj Mehta really flip off American people on TV?

[Day 201] “Ew white people”

Today, I went for a boba run with Tucker. He wanted to go to a boba place, but I wanted to go to another because that other place was better. Tucker said: “I wouldn’t know. I can probably tell a terrible boba from an average one, but I wouldn’t be able to tell a good boba from a mediocre one.”

And I said: “Ew white people!”

And Tucker was slightly offended: “What’s wrong with being white?”

Continue reading “[Day 201] “Ew white people””

[Day 201] “Ew white people”

[Day 176] Why Stanford has the coterm program

Co-terminal master’s degree is a unique Stanford’s program that allows Stanford undergraduates to stay on for an extra year to earn a master’s degree. You have to apply, but it’s  a pretty easy and sweat-free process. Almost everyone I know who applied  got in. I never knew about the history of the program until today, when I talked to Pat Langley.

Continue reading “[Day 176] Why Stanford has the coterm program”

[Day 176] Why Stanford has the coterm program

[Day 169] The magic of phonetic writing

In my anthropology class, there is this lady who comes to every lecture with a peculiar-looking keyboard and transcribes everything everyone says in the room. The average rate for English speakers in the US is 150 wpm, so I estimate her writing speed is well above 150 wpm because she gets everything everyone says right, even manages to insert things like *bell chiming* or *indiscernible sound in the background*. This is really impressive, given that professional typists only have the speed of 75-85 wpm.

So, after lecture today, I decided to come and introduce myself to her. When I told Sarah, the lady’s name, about my fascination with her typing, she was very excited. She told me she loved talking about that, because she thinks it’s magical too. Here is a picture of the setup that she uses:

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[Day 169] The magic of phonetic writing

[Day 164] Life without Facebook

Hey,

I just want to let you know that I’ve been off Facebook for a month, and I haven’t had any desire to get back on it. It’s liberating. Here are some aspects of my life that have become much better without Facebook.

  • I feel more connected to people. It’s ironic since Facebook is supposed to help you connect to your friends, but I feel that connections on Facebook are superficial because they are too convenient. Now, people I interact with are people who really want to interact with me. They would go out of their way to get my number or to send me an email. And I do the same to people I want to connect with.

Continue reading “[Day 164] Life without Facebook”

[Day 164] Life without Facebook

[Day 163] Being a girl doing muay thai

I’m taking a muay Thai class at  Stanford. It’s not as tough as it sounds. When I did it in Malaysia, the master was like: “50 push-ups, 50 sit-ups, 50 squats, no stop. Hey you, why are you stopping? Do 20 more. Pain is just a state of mind.” Here the instructor is like: “Okay relax your muscles, don’t try too hard, and have a good evening.” It’s a chill environment. I had been enjoying the class until yesterday, when my partner made me realize the uncomfortable reality.

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[Day 163] Being a girl doing muay thai